Mantra Maven Blog

We've all heard by know. Senator Edward "Teddy" Moore Kennedy passed away last night. As a follower of all things past and present politics, I am familiar with his story—the youngest brother of the privileged Kennedy clan who lost three older brothers at the hands of war or gunmens' bullets, as well as a beloved sister to a plane crash and another (in spirit) to an experimental operation who overcame it all, including a very public divorce, tragic auto accident and death of a nephew, to rise to the heights of influence in the United States Senate championing the needs of the underserved. Phew! How'd I do? Yes, like everyone, many of his life’s circumstances were self-inflicted by individual choices but the biggest ones, the most tragic choices, were made for him. Today, as I watched the pundits argue Senator Kennedy’s achievements and legacy, one point struck me the most. If we had gone through the circumstances of his life combined with the weight of the Kennedy legacy, many of us might have just laid down on the floor and never had the strength to get up again—figuratively and literally. To me, Senator Kennedy's legacy if the fact that he did get up...time and time again. And he did so with generosity of spirit and enthusiasm for life. I don't know about you but I'm taking note.

Many blessings,
Tiffany  

It's been four days. The celebration of Barack Obama's historic win of the Presidency is just beginning to set into the consciousness of our country. As an African American woman, I am especially proud to see him ascend to the highest position in our government. I think it is a testament to the healing we have undergone as a nation in regards to race. But I also think it represents a growing desire of the American people for more truth, leadership and inspiration from our elected officials. And although his election in itself is something that could not have been predicted even a year ago, what I am most astonished by is the reaction from the world. When Barack Obama was named the projected winner of the Presidency, news traveled around the world in an instant. Images flashed across our television screens from Germany, France, Great Britain, Kenya, Japan and Australia--all celebrating our new President and the belief that the promise of America was still alive. There was joy, hope and yes, tears from a world of supporters who did not have a vote but had a stake in our election. After the difficulty of the past years, it's wonderful to again be living up to the greatness that is America. 

Many blessings,
Tiffany

 

Like many of you, I watched Barack Obama's acceptance speech last night for the Democratic's Party's nomination for President. Whatever you political leanings, you can't ignore the significance of the event. The first African-American nominee for a major party accepting the nomination on the 45th anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I Have a Dream" speech in a stadium of more than 85,000 cheering supporters. In response to this opponent's tactics, he called for the country to not make this "big election" about "small things." He asked for the country to say "enough" to the previous eight year's deference to big business and minimizing of the needs of its people. "I am my brother's keeper," he said. "I am my sister's keeper." I couldn't help but think, his message about aspiration and togetherness is both a political and spiritual one. Marianne Williamson, in her efforts to create a Department of Peace in Washington D.C., has spoken often about the intersection of spirituality and politics. Contrary to many, the two are not mutually exclusive. Our country has wisely kept religion out of politics but spirituality.....it encompasses everything we do and everything we are. Are we ready for a new approach to politics?

Many blessings,
Tiffany

I'm a big fan of Oprah's Soul Series. During her Soul Series, she interviews an individual who has left a mark on her in regards to spirituality. In a recent episode, she interviewed Wayne Dyer about his latest book about reflections of the Tao in his most recent book, Change for Thoughts, Change your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao. The book is made up of his personal reflections on the Tao Te Ching, a book of Chinese philosopy written by Lao-tzu more than 2,500 years ago. During the discussion, Oprah and Wayne briefly discussed the upcoming election season. Oprah mentioned how great it would be to have "Tao centered leadership" in our country. Wayne felt it was on it's way. I really had to sit down to think about that. During this election season, we've heard so much about candidates and their perceived accomplishments, spouses, past votes, affiliations, educational backgrounds, family lineage, etc. Wouldn't it be interesting to factor in their consciousness to lead as well? What type of impact might that have on the direction of our country? Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm...

Many blessings,
Tiffany

It's been a week and three days since Tim Russert has left us. As an avid fan of Mr. Russert and Meet the Press, I was shocked. In the days following his death, I watched the hours of NBC and MSNBC tributes--even the televised funeral coverage. Conventional wisdom would say for someone who did not know him personally, I have adequately grieved. Believe me. I know this. But it was the coverage of his life--the parade of friends, the love he had for his family, the joy of politics and his work, the honor he gave to faith, and the way he seemed to relish every minute of life that made me increasingly more sorry to see him gone so soon. Maybe through our own lives, we can honor his, which was obviously lived to the fullest. Just give me a few more days. 

Many blessings,
Tiffany